Friday, 17 May 2013

Coast to Coast Sweden: Bridges and Boardwalks

As I wandered along the byways and roads, I spent a lot of time noticing the natural and man made features, capturing photos of some of these features, this post will look at just a few of the bridges and boardwalks, I crossed.

As I left Växjö I walked along the promenade which overlooks the lake, with the Växjö cathedral in the background, for me it was sunny but as the group from Kalmar arrived the weather was less pleasant.
  Promenade Växjö

Leaving the city precinct I entered a farm and forest area, crossing over a bridge for the inlet into Bergkvarasjön, nearby was an older bridge which had been replaced by a new concrete bridge, I preferred older stone bridge.

  Bridge across Bergkvarasjön inlet

My love for old stone bridges was rewarded again with this small bridge near Vegby, I can just think of the work that went into building these bridges, much of it would have been by hand, whereas these days it is machines that do the work.

  Early morning light on bridge over stream near Vegby

The first real boardwalk I came across was on the Munleden (Monks trail) it crossed a very damp heath area, can you imagine what it would have been like to cross such an area without a boardwalk?

  Boardwalk Munksleden

Clearly the Monks using the trail would have had problems, but I found evidence that they were using Pacer poles even in those days. They were ahead of their time.

  The Monks used Pacer Poles

Store Mosse is a wonderful National Park and well worth a visit, and if you wish to train for the boardwalks in lapland and other locales, then this is the place to come to, there are many kilometres of boardwalks in all conditions which you can wander on and test your balance.

  Boardwalk in Store Mosse NP


I was very much taken by this Iron bridge at Stjärnhyltan, the fact that it has stood for almost 100 years is impressive in itself.
  Iron Bridge Stjärnhyltan

It was also pleasing to see that the builders were proud of their work and happy to place their names on the bridge, something you see very little of these days.

  We made this bridge almost 100 years ago
I was also keen to take a closer look at the "arch".

  Closeup Iron Bridge Stjärnhyltan

The final bridge which I found interesting was a complete contrast, a wooden bridge, near Villastad, there is something about wood, it has a warmth that steel can never provide.

  Wooden Bridge over Nissan Villastad

There were of course many more bridges, but for me the ones included here were special.

 Next up will be a look at interesting buildings.